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University of Connecticut College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Medieval Studies Program

Recent News and Events

Below are some highlights of recent news and events for the Medieval Studies Program. For a full calendar and information about upcoming events, please visit this site.

2013

30th Annual New England Medieval Studies Consortium Graduate Conference

Abstracts from graduate students are now being accepted for the 30th annual New England Medieval Studies Consortium Graduate Student Conference, to be held at the University of Connecticut on Saturday, March 16, 2013. This year’s theme will be “Collaborations.”

“Collaborations” is a concept that pervades both the medieval period and the field of medieval studies, and provides a major theme for considering a variety of relevant subjects. In its breadth, this theme is meant to encompass a wide array of topics from graduate students working in all areas of medieval studies. Toward this end, we welcome papers from an assortment of disciplines, including:

Anthropology — Archaeology — Art History — Byzantine Studies — Classical Studies —Digital Humanities — Gender Studies — History — History of Science — Islamic Studies — Judaic Studies — Language Studies — Literary Studies — Mediterranean Studies — Manuscript Studies — Musicology — Philosophy — Religious Studies — Theology

We also look forward to papers that incorporate or deal with notions of interdisciplinary or multi-disciplinary methods; and that examine the theme of collaborations theoretically.

Possible topics include (but are not limited to):
Collaborations in medieval culture
Receptions of the medieval in the modern world
Collaborations in academia
Interdisciplinary/multi-disciplinary methodologies
Theories of collaboration

The deadline for submissions is February 1, 2013. Abstracts of up to 250 words should be e-mailed to Brandon Hawk and Patrick Butler at uconn.nemsc@gmail.com. Papers should be no more than 20 minutes in length and read in English. Graduate students whose abstracts are selected for the conference will have the opportunity to submit their papers prior to the conference to be considered for the Alison Goddard Elliott Award for the Outstanding Conference Paper.

For more information about NEMSC, see our website.

2012

Summer Psalms Symposium

The Summer Psalms Symposium, hosted by the University of Connecticut Medieval Studies Program, was held on Tuesday, August 7. The Symposium included presentations on the theme by:

Stephen Harris (English, University of Massachusetts, Amherst)
Clare Costley King'oo (English, University of Connecticut)
Fiona Somerset (English, University of Connecticut)

These presentations were followed by a round-table discussion about the subject.

As a follow-up to the symposium, the organizers and presenters compiled a bibliography as an introductory too for research. The document may be found here (Adobe Reader needed to view).

Dr. Susan Einbinder Hired as Professor of Hebrew and Judaic Studies

We are pleased to announce that Dr. Susan Einbinder has been hired as Professor of Hebrew and Judaic Studies. Dr. Einbinder holds a Ph.D. in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University, and was formerly Professor of Hebrew Literature at HUC-JIR/Cincinnati.

She has published two monographs on medieval Judaism, entitled No Place of Rest: Jewish Literature, Expulsion, and the Memory of Medieval France (U of Pennsylvania P, 2009) and Beautiful Death: Jewish Poetry and Martyrdom in Medieval France (Princeton UP, 2002); and she is currently in progress on a third, entitled Detours and Delays: On Medieval Jewish History and Literature. A 2004 recipient of the prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship that allowed her to pursue research on her second book, Dr. Einbinder has also received a fellowship at the Institute of Advanced Studies, School of Historical Studies, as well as a grant from the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia.

Dr. Fiona Somerset Hired as Professor of English

We are pleased to announce that Dr. Fiona Somerset has been hired as Associate Professor of English. Dr. Somerset earned her Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1995. Her appointments include a Junior Research Fellowship at Lady Margaret Hall, UK (1995-1997); Assistant Professor of English (1997-2000) and Associate Professor of English (2000-2002) at the University of Western Ontario; Visiting Associate Professor at Washington University, St. Louis (2002); and Associate Professor of English at Duke University (2002-2012).

Dr. Somerset focuses on the history of the book, multilingualism, cultural theory, legal history, medieval philosophy, historiography, and the history of emotion. She has written extensively about Wycliffism, or lollardy, a religious reform movement in late medieval England that was persecuted as a heresy. She has also written about Chaucer’s poetry, Piers Plowman, the translations of John Trevisa, Lydgate, emotions in mysticism, and Margery Kempe. She is the author of Clerical Discourse and Lay Audience in Late Medieval England (Cambridge UP, 1998) and Four Wycliffite Dialogues, EETS 333 (Oxford UP, 2009); her Classics of Western Spirituality volume on Wycliffite Spirituality (with J. Patrick Hornbeck and Stephen Lahey) is in press. She has edited two essay collections: The Vulgar Tongue: Medieval and Post-Medieval Vernacularity (with Nicholas Watson), and Lollards and their Influence (with Jill Havens and Derrick Pitard). She is now finishing a monograph on the writings of the lollard movement, Feeling Like Saints, and researching a new book on medieval social consent from 1100-1500. She is developing a digital humanities project for the collaborative, comparative study of highly variable texts in manuscript culture, and is co-editor of The Yearbook of Langland Studies.

Medieval Studies Undergraduate Minor

In spring 2012 the Medieval Studies Advisory Committee began to implement a minor in Medieval Studies for the University of Connecticut undergraduate curriculum. Sherri Olson is heading up the proposal, to be submitted in fall 2012.

Fourteenth Annual Medieval Studies Secondary Schools Outreach Seminar

The Medieval Studies Program held its annual Outreach Seminar on Friday, March 30, 2012. The subject of the seminar was "Robin Hood," and presentations were given by Jean Givens, Robert Hasenfratz, Sherri Olson, and Kisha Tracy; Eric Rice also directed a performance by the Collegium Musicum. More information may be found on the Outreach website.

2011

Thirteenth Annual Medieval Studies Secondary Schools Outreach Seminar

The Medieval Studies Program held its annual Outreach Seminar on Friday, April 8 2011. The subject of the seminar was "The Medieval Book," and presentations were given by Frederick Biggs, Jean Givens, Sherri Olson, and Jeanette Zissell; Eric Rice also directed a performance of the Collegium Musicum. More information may be found on the Outreach website.

2010

New England Medieval Conference

The New England Medieval Conference held its annual meeting at the University of Connecticut in Storrs, CT, November 5-7, 2010. NEMC was founded by Archibald Lewis (University of Massachusetts, Amherst) in 1974. The 2010 conference theme was "Other Worlds and the Otherworldly in the Middle Ages." It featured seven papers by faculty from colleges and universities throughout New England; a musical performance by the University of Connecticut Collegium Musicum; and a plenary address by Norris J. Lacy, The Pennsylvania State University, entitled "Arthurian Interstices: The Spaces Between Worlds."

New England Medieval Studies Consortium

The New England Medieval Studies Consortium held its annual graduate conference on April 10, 2010. The 2010 conference theme was "Medieval Perspectives from the Mundane to the Miraculous." The program featured three session, comprising twenty papers by graduate students, two roundtable workshops, and a plenary lecture by Amy Appleford entitled "Radical Catechesis: Death and the Politics of Religious Instruction in Late Medieval England."